Shoulder Replacement

Shoulder Replacement Surgery is available to patients who have been diagnosed with osteoarthritis or other chronic degenerative changes of the shoulder. Chronic pain or reduced function of the shoulder can occur after acute or chronic injuries have damaged the shoulder joint or surrounding tendons and ligaments.

Shoulder replacement is available when the shoulder joint is stiff, painful, or damaged, usually a result of arthritis, and when conservative measures – pain medication, injections, and physical therapy are no longer effective in managing symptoms.

Shoulder Replacement Surgery With Clearpoint Health

Patients from across Canada and all over the world choose Clearpoint Health’s private medical clinics for Shoulder Replacement surgery. Our orthopedic surgeons have years of experience and excellence in performance and outcomes with this procedure.

We are committed to helping you regain full motion in your extremity so that you can go back to your daily activities. We strive to provide exceptional pre and post-operative care. Combined with our patient centred philosophy, we aim to provide all our patients with a compassionate, caring, and rewarding experience. Canadians have access to private healthcare in Canada with Clearpoint Health. We’re a network of private medical clinics across Canada, with accredited centres in Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg, and Calgary.

#103 – 20 Wynford Drive
Toronto, Ontario M3C 1J4

What to Expect with Shoulder Replacement Surgery

Shoulder Replacement surgery at our private centres in Canada involves removing damaged portions of the shoulder and replacing the bony surfaces with man-made prosthetic implants. The surgery repositions the shoulder into proper alignment and replicates the original function, allowing for a near normal range of motion for the patient.

Our surgeon will be able to discuss the recommended technique and prosthetic to suit your needs. During a consultation, we will review the procedure including the risks, benefits, recovery, and life after the procedure. It is important to remember that Shoulder Replacement is still major surgery. Please keep in mind that setbacks and complications can still happen and there is always going to be post-operative pain and swelling. It is important to remember that everyone reacts differently to surgery and anaesthetic, but in our experience, the techniques and protocols used by our surgeons and anaesthetists allows for faster rehabilitation to get you back to your old self.

FAQs

What is this procedure for and how will it alleviate my symptoms?

Shoulder Replacement Surgery is available to patients who have been diagnosed with osteoarthritis or other chronic degenerative changes of the shoulder as a result of fracture or over use.    Shoulder replacement surgery is very successful for pain relief and will improve range of motion and function. The degree of improvement depends on individual patient’s pre-surgical status but the risks and benefits will be discussed during your consultation with the surgeon.

How should I prepare for my consultation and surgery?

The first step is to have an MRI of your affected shoulder.  This can be arranged by your family physician. Prepare your questions for the surgeon to answer during your consultation.    Your surgeon may suggest that you lose weight and initiate an exercise program to achieve the most successful recovery. Smoking can significantly affect the healing process.  If you smoke, be sure to speak with your surgeon about it, as smoking can dangerously increase surgical risks and slow down the healing process.

How do I qualify for this procedure?

All patients are required to complete a Pre-Surgical Patient Questionnaire to provide us with your basic medical history. We also request your most recent MRI images.  Should these confirm you are a suitable patient for the procedure and our facility we will request a History and Physical Form be completed along with bloodwork and ECG via your family doctor.

 

What happens during surgery?

A lot of shoulder pain is caused when the cartilage on the ends of the bones is gone and there is bone rubbing on bone in the joint. Shoulder Replacement surgery involves removing damaged portions of the shoulder and replacing the bony surfaces with prosthetic implants.  The anatomical ball and socket joint in comprised of the humeral head (ball) located at the end of the humerus and the socket is part of and located within the shoulder blade (scapula). The ball is held in the socket by ligaments and by the rotator cuff tendons. The rotator cuff muscles start on the shoulder blade and turn into tendons which attach to the ball. In shoulder replacement surgery the ball is replace with a partial sphere made of metal. This partial sphere sits on top of a metal stem that fits down into the shaft of the humerus. Sometimes cement is utilized to keep the stem in place. The socket portion of the joint is replaced with an oblong disk with a cupped surface, which lines the socket and replaces the damaged cartilage. The partial sphere fits into this cupped surface to re-create the natural shoulder joint. Whether a socket is used or not depends upon how bad the arthritis is in the shoulder and whether the rotator cuff tendons are intact.

In cases where significant damage is limited to only the ball portion of the joint, your surgeon may consider a procedure that preserves the healthy socket of your shoulder. This is called a partial shoulder replacement. In a partial shoulder replacement, only one side (the diseased portion) of the joint is replaced, leaving the healthy portion untouched. A successful partial shoulder replacement may relieve pain and preserve more of your natural shoulder. It may delay, and in some cases prevent, the need for total shoulder replacement.

If your rotator cuff is so damaged that it would not be able to support a traditional joint replacement, your surgeon may recommend a “reverse” shoulder replacement. This procedure reverses the ball and socket configuration of your shoulder, allowing other muscles to compensate for your damaged rotator cuff. Reverse total shoulder replacement can result in increased stability, strength and range-of-motion in your shoulder joint.

What is the average process like and how long will it take for me to return to my normal activities?

Our surgeon will be able to discuss the recommended technique and prosthetic to suit your needs. You will be provided with specific post-operative instructions including rehabilitation required during each phase of your recovery. Physical therapy begins the day after surgery with slow, specific movement of the fingers, wrist and elbow. Some motion of the shoulder will begin within a day or so after surgery and formal physiotherapy within 2 weeks post-op.

Next steps: Book your consultation today

If you are ready to discuss your Shoulder Replacement surgery needs with our orthopedic surgeons, contact us to learn more and request a consultation today. Please note that we will require your x-ray and/or MRI images along with some basic medical history in order to appropriately prepare for your consultation. Consultation can take place via telephone or video conference.